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Tibet Isn't a Buddhist Litmus Test

Why Unpredictability Hurts, But Uncertainty Thrives

Why Unpredictability Hurts, But Uncertainty Thrives

I doubt that there really is a Chinese curse that goes, “May you live in uncertain times,” but people do fear uncertainty. Look at the past ten days alone. Beginning with an oil spill approaching the Louisiana wetlands and popping noises coming from a black SUV abandoned in Times Square, ending with a Teetering Greece and a plunging stock market, the malaise of uncertainty has been especially severe. Wall Street hates uncertainty, reflecting everyone’s unease when the ground beneath their feet starts to shift.

Why Unpredictability Hurts, But Uncertainty Thrives

Tea Parties or “Yes We Can” — Choose Your Epidemic

It’s time for people to realize the power of “social contagion.” That’s a term invented by researchers to describe how influence spreads from one person to another. At the level of common sense, we all know that gossip and rumors have a life of their own, as do urban legends. Yesterday’s conspiracy theories about the Kennedy assassination give way to shadowy paranoia about President Obama’s birth certificate. But social contagion reaches deeper than common sense ever realized.

Crossing a Spiritual Divide

Last December a poll revealed something encouraging about spirituality in America. When asked if they had ever had a religious or mystical experience, more responders said yes than no. This was a first in the 47 years that the Pew Research pollsters have been asking the question. (A religious or mystical experience was defined as “moment of sudden religious insight or awakening.”

Does God Have a Future?

Off and on for twenty years I’ve thought deeply about God and his chances of survival (for “his” you can substitute “her” or “its,” since an all-powerful, all-knowing, ever-present deity doesn’t have a fixed gender). But this Sunday, God’s survival became the subject of a debate before an audience at Cal Tech.

If you’re interested, the debate will later be televised on ABC’s Nightline. My debating partner was noted author and spiritual teacher Jean Houston. On the side representing atheism was Dr. Michael Shermer, the editor of Skeptic magazine, and Sam Harris, who wrote the bestseller, Letter to a Christian Nation.  (I’m writing this preview before the actual event, but the article will appear afterward.)

The Fatal Prescription Pad

Is this about health care or spiritual care?

By the time this post appears, the Senate will probably have agreed on some kind of health care bill. I wanted to assess the hidden side of the bill, whatever emerges. It took five months for Congress to grind its way to a conclusion on this issue, and along the way we got to see an ugly side of the democratic process.

The Fatal Prescription Pad

The Fatal Prescription Pad

It’s well known that the most expensive medical technology in America is a doctor’s ballpoint pen. Doctors call for hundreds of billions of dollars in unnecessary tests and procedures every year. This has become a major thrust in healthcare reform. But now we discover that the prescription pad can also be deadly.

Can Dying Be a Peak Experience?

Does end-of-life care prolong life or does it prolong suffering? Should it be a part of health-care reform?

As a humane gesture, comforting people at the end of their lives is valuable and has been part of the hospice movement, not to mention pastoral care, for a long time. As anyone who has spent time with the dying knows, it’s the family who is most distraught; the person who is actually nearing the end has generally come to terms with his situation and found some measure of peace.

Can Dying Be a Peak Experience?

Does end-of-life care prolong life or does it prolong suffering? Should it be a part of health-care reform?

As a humane gesture, comforting people at the end of their lives is valuable and has been part of the hospice movement, not to mention pastoral care, for a long time. As anyone who has spent time with the dying knows, it’s the family who is most distraught; the person who is actually nearing the end has generally come to terms with his situation and found some measure of peace.

Can You Change The Past?

By Robert Lanza and Deepak Chopra
Can decisions we make now change the past?  Modern physics tells us that particles possess a range of possible states, and that it’s not until the actual act of observation that they take on real physical properties. Until this occurs there cannot be a past. Even eminent physicists Stephen Hawking and John Wheeler (one of Einstein’s last collaborators) agree it can be no other way.

Reinventing the Body, Resurrecting the Soul

Dear Readers and Friends,

In our quest to grow and evolve, we all run into obstacles. We meet resistance. Change proves stubborn and at times impossible. Anything that I can do to overcome these obstacles is a contribution I never wish to pass up.

In my new book I address the most difficult obstacle of all: the body.